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Contact: Elena Hartwell - elenahartwell@gmail.com and visit me on the web at www.elenahartwell.com

Spotlight on Scott Driscoll

An award-winning instructor (the University of Washington, Educational Outreach award for Excellence in Teaching in the Arts and Humanities 2006), Scott Driscoll holds an MFA from the University of Washington and has been teaching creative writing for the University of Washington Extension for seventeen years.

Driscoll makes his living as a writer and teacher. While finishing Better You Go Home—a novel that has been several years in the making and which grew out of the exploration of the Czech side of his family in the 1990s after Eastern Europe became liberated—Driscoll kept busy freelancing stories to a variety of magazines, both commercial and literary. He most often writes feature stories on subjects ranging from health to philanthropy to education to general reporting for Alaska and Horizon Airlines Magazines, but he also does profiles and book reviews, including an October 2010 profile for Ferrari Magazine 11, and a July/August '08 profile in Poets and Writers Magazine.


Click on the Photo to link with Scott's Blog

His short stories and narrative essays have been published extensively in literary journals and anthologies, including Image Magazine, Far From Home (a Seal Press anthology), Ex-Files: New Stories About Old Flames (a Context Books fiction anthology featuring high-profile writers such as David Foster Wallace, Jennifer Egan, and Junot Diaz), The Seattle Review, Crosscurrents, Cimarron Review, The South Dakota Review, Gulfstream, American Fiction '88 and others.

Driscoll has been awarded seven Society of Professional Journalists awards, most recently in 2009 for social issues reporting, and including best education reporting and general reporting 2004. His narrative essay about his daughter's coming of age was cited in the Best American Essays, 1998, and while in the MFA program, he won the University of Washington's Milliman Award for Fiction (1989).


Scroll Down to Read Part II and Part I at the bottom

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